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Month: July 2016

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Preventing Heat Stress in Your Lawn

Preventing Heat Stress in Your Lawn

in more ways than one. We are considered part of the Pacific Northwest; however, we don’t share many of the qualities often associated with the region. Our winters are cold and often dry. Spring changes quickly to summer, and rainfall is drastically less than the rest of Pacific Northwest. In reality, we’re a northwest and southern climate blend. This creates some interesting challenges for our lawns to overcome.

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Preparing Your Pets for Warmer Weather

Preparing Your Pets for Warmer Weather

With spring comes revitalization and the promise of resuming all of your favorite outdoor activities. However, spring can quickly come and pass, leaving us with the heat of summer before we know it. Being prepared for seasonal changes is part of being a responsible pet owner. Take care of those that rely on you, by making preparations to keep them safe and happy in the warmer months to come.

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Tarantula Care Sheet

Tarantula Care Sheet

There is great variation in color, size, body style, and temperament between different species of Tarantulas. Some are docile and are easily handled while other species are strictly for observation only. While males of most species are typically more vibrant than females, they generally have a much shorter lifespan than their female counterparts (about half the length). Tarantulas are very low maintenance pets and often require modest enclosures, which allow them to fit easily on your desktop, in a classroom, or on a bedroom dresser.

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How to Kill Chinch Bugs

How to Kill Chinch Bugs

Sometimes those brown patches in your lawn are not caused by billbugs or lawn fungus. Another insect that is causing damage to Treasure Valley lawns is the chinch bug. Adult chinch bugs are about one-fifth of an inch long and black with white wings folded over their backs. The insect mates early in the season when the temperature reaches 70 degrees Fahrenheit. The female lays eggs on roots, stems, leaves, leaf sheaths or crevices in nodes and other protected places. Eggs are laid over a 2 to 3 week period, with one female laying as many as 500 eggs.

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